October212014
6PM
axispowersshella:

auplaz:

Alright guys, this shit got me heated. 
So today as I was getting ready for school, I get a call from my youngest sister’s elementary school clinic. My sister gets on the phone and tells me she is sitting out of class because her skirt is too short. “You need to bring me one that goes down to my knees, they said,” is what she told me.
Quick recap: My sister is eleven years old, in fifth grade, and has some mental and physical disabilities. She’s the tallest girl in her class. Also, the dress code states her skirt must be down to her fingertips, not her knees.
When I get there, I insisted I see her instead of just dropping her stuff off. I was not suprised to find her with a skirt obviously within the rules of the dress code. I asked her what class she was missing and she told me math. She’d been sitting out for atleast twenty or thirty minutes while she waited for me to come.
She only learns things at about a third of the pace as everyone else in her class. Even missing this short amount of time means missing a lot of information for her. Just to recap: she has to sit out of class because of the length of her skirt. She can’t even just sit in her classroom while she waits for me, because apparently that’s too distracting. To whom, you ask? I can’t really tell you. Are ten year old boys, fifth grade boys already old enough to be sexualizing her to the point that they were going so insane with horniness that they had to whisk her away until she could put on something ‘decent’. 
So not only are they sexualizing a fifth grader, they are giving her different rules for the dress code based on her height and making her miss valuable class time. This bullshit needs to stop. Eleven goddamn years old and she’s already being taught her body isn’t her own anymore, that she’s being too provocative if she wears a skirt to the same standard as all the other short, skinny girls in her class just because she looks older.
As a P.S., I would like to point out that she is already bullied because of her disabilities. Pulling her out of class and making her change is even more of an embarrassment, and only leads to more teasing. 

please signal boost this.

axispowersshella:

auplaz:

Alright guys, this shit got me heated. 

So today as I was getting ready for school, I get a call from my youngest sister’s elementary school clinic. My sister gets on the phone and tells me she is sitting out of class because her skirt is too short. “You need to bring me one that goes down to my knees, they said,” is what she told me.

Quick recap: My sister is eleven years old, in fifth grade, and has some mental and physical disabilities. She’s the tallest girl in her class. Also, the dress code states her skirt must be down to her fingertips, not her knees.

When I get there, I insisted I see her instead of just dropping her stuff off. I was not suprised to find her with a skirt obviously within the rules of the dress code. I asked her what class she was missing and she told me math. She’d been sitting out for atleast twenty or thirty minutes while she waited for me to come.

She only learns things at about a third of the pace as everyone else in her class. Even missing this short amount of time means missing a lot of information for her. Just to recap: she has to sit out of class because of the length of her skirt. She can’t even just sit in her classroom while she waits for me, because apparently that’s too distracting. To whom, you ask? I can’t really tell you. Are ten year old boys, fifth grade boys already old enough to be sexualizing her to the point that they were going so insane with horniness that they had to whisk her away until she could put on something ‘decent’. 

So not only are they sexualizing a fifth grader, they are giving her different rules for the dress code based on her height and making her miss valuable class time. This bullshit needs to stop. Eleven goddamn years old and she’s already being taught her body isn’t her own anymore, that she’s being too provocative if she wears a skirt to the same standard as all the other short, skinny girls in her class just because she looks older.

As a P.S., I would like to point out that she is already bullied because of her disabilities. Pulling her out of class and making her change is even more of an embarrassment, and only leads to more teasing. 

please signal boost this.

(via solennita)

5PM
letterstomycountry:

Via A Mighty Girl:

Professional hacker Parisa Tabriz is responsible for keeping the nearly billion users of Google Chrome safe by finding vulnerabilities in their system before malicious hackers do. Tabriz, a “white hat” hacker who calls herself Google’s “Security Princess”, is head of the company’s information security engineering team. The 31-year-old Polish-Iranian-American is also an anomaly in Silicon Valley according to a recent profile in The Telegraph: “Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe.”Tabriz came up with “Security Princess” while at a conference and the unusual title is printed on her business card. “I knew I’d have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring,” she says. “Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.” Her curiosity, mischievousness, and innovative thinking are all assets in her business: a high-profile company like Google is constantly in the crosshairs of so-called “black hat” hackers.Tabriz came into internet security almost by accident; at the University of Illinois’ computer engineering program, her interest was first whetted by the story of early hacker John Draper, who became known as Captain Crunch in the 1960s after he learned how to make free long-distance calls using a toy whistle from a Cap’n Crunch cereal box. She realized that, to beat the hackers of today, she had to be prepared for similar — but more advanced — out-of-the-box thinking.While women at still very under-represented in the tech industry — Google recently reported that only 30% of its staff is female — Tabriz has hope for the future: “[F]ifty years ago there were similar percentages of women in medicine and law, now thankfully that’s shifted.” And, while she hasn’t encountered overt sexism at Google, when she was offered the position, at least one classmate said, “you know you only got it cos you’re a girl.” To help address this imbalance, she mentors under-16 students at a yearly computer science conference that teaches kids how to “hack for good” — and she especially encourages girls to pursue internet security work. One 16-year-old who attended, Trinity Nordstrom, says, “Parisa is a good role model, because of her I’d like to be a hacker.”Tabriz, who was named by Forbes as one of the “top 30 under 30 to watch” in 2012, also wants the public to realize that hacking can be used for positive ends. “[H]acking can be ugly,” she says. “The guy who published the private photos of those celebrities online made headlines everywhere. What he did was not only a violation of these women but it was criminal, and as a hacker I was very saddened by it. I feel like we, the hackers, need better PR to show we’re not all like that… [A]fter all I’m in the business of protecting people.”To read more about Google’s “Security Princess” in The Telegraph, visit http://bit.ly/Z6Z5RG

letterstomycountry:

Via A Mighty Girl:

Professional hacker Parisa Tabriz is responsible for keeping the nearly billion users of Google Chrome safe by finding vulnerabilities in their system before malicious hackers do. Tabriz, a “white hat” hacker who calls herself Google’s “Security Princess”, is head of the company’s information security engineering team. The 31-year-old Polish-Iranian-American is also an anomaly in Silicon Valley according to a recent profile in The Telegraph: “Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe.”

Tabriz came up with “Security Princess” while at a conference and the unusual title is printed on her business card. “I knew I’d have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring,” she says. “Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.” Her curiosity, mischievousness, and innovative thinking are all assets in her business: a high-profile company like Google is constantly in the crosshairs of so-called “black hat” hackers.

Tabriz came into internet security almost by accident; at the University of Illinois’ computer engineering program, her interest was first whetted by the story of early hacker John Draper, who became known as Captain Crunch in the 1960s after he learned how to make free long-distance calls using a toy whistle from a Cap’n Crunch cereal box. She realized that, to beat the hackers of today, she had to be prepared for similar — but more advanced — out-of-the-box thinking.

While women at still very under-represented in the tech industry — Google recently reported that only 30% of its staff is female — Tabriz has hope for the future: “[F]ifty years ago there were similar percentages of women in medicine and law, now thankfully that’s shifted.” And, while she hasn’t encountered overt sexism at Google, when she was offered the position, at least one classmate said, “you know you only got it cos you’re a girl.” To help address this imbalance, she mentors under-16 students at a yearly computer science conference that teaches kids how to “hack for good” — and she especially encourages girls to pursue internet security work. One 16-year-old who attended, Trinity Nordstrom, says, “Parisa is a good role model, because of her I’d like to be a hacker.”

Tabriz, who was named by Forbes as one of the “top 30 under 30 to watch” in 2012, also wants the public to realize that hacking can be used for positive ends. “[H]acking can be ugly,” she says. “The guy who published the private photos of those celebrities online made headlines everywhere. What he did was not only a violation of these women but it was criminal, and as a hacker I was very saddened by it. I feel like we, the hackers, need better PR to show we’re not all like that… [A]fter all I’m in the business of protecting people.”

To read more about Google’s “Security Princess” in The Telegraph, visit http://bit.ly/Z6Z5RG

(via continuants)

October202014

hillarygayle:

morethanonepage:

veganasana:

amoying:

maplesuhtori:

j0shdngr:

chill it’s cos your rare

the entire female population of east asia is rare?

homie ur about to be cooked medium rare and sacrificed

Omg

It got better

(Source: impastabowl, via solennita)

11AM

monsterousgirl:

le-claire-de-lune:

ladysaviours:

you know what would be cool? a show about, like, vigilante Victorian prostitutes hunting down Jack the Ripper.

They never did figure out why he stopped killing.  And most serial killers don’t stop unless they are stopped. I’m just saying. 

brb writing the script

(Source: ladyspirits, via literatureloveaffair)

October192014
“And now Klaus is apparently running off to go and save Sunny. In the books of course it is Violet, but I know that Hollywood prefers its female actresses to do very little.” Lemony Snicket, A Series of Unfortunate Events audio commentary (via literatureloveaffair)
October182014

Anonymous said: As a fan with a garden variety of ships in various fandoms, slash, het, canon, non-canon, in my opinion no one is entitled to their ship becoming canon, that may be an assholish opinion, but that's how I see it. Basically I am agreeing with you.

startraveller776:

image

That’s generally how I feel. I ship my ships because the chemistry between two characters—potential or actual—really grabs me. Sure, it would be great if the screenwriters actually shared the same preference with me, making it possible for me to see the actors play out the romance in my head. But it’s no skin off my nose if they don’t. I ship cross-fandom pairings. There’s no way in hell I’ll ever see those made canon. Not going to stop me from loving those ships, though.

I think the problem lies in a word you used: entitled. That’s the kind of thinking that has fans chasing down actors and then bad-mouthing them (sometimes to their faces or on twitter) when they don’t want to be at everyone’s beck and call—because god forbid they actually have a life outside of meeting fans and taking selfies with them. That’s the kind of thinking that has fans sending actor’s spouses hate for daring to marry their beloved icons. That’s the kind of thinking that has fans sending scathing messages to actors who have no control over the direction and writing of a television series or film.

Entitlement is what has some fans believing their opinions about a franchise, film, or series (including, but not limited to, ships) are superior to other fans and therefore should be listened to—and implemented—by the writers and creators of said franchise/film/series.

It’s one thing to vent your disappointments and frustrations with your buddies. It’s another to attack other fans, to attack the actors, producers, writers, and creators over your preferences. And I’ll add that I have nothing against petitioning Hollywood for better representation for certain types of pairings—but again, social justice is still not an excuse for bad behavior. Trolling other fans who ship ships you feel interfere with the cause? Nope, not excused. Trolling actors who choose to remain neutral about how their characters are written (i.e.—protecting their livelihood)? Still not excused. And while inundating the creators with messages is actually more in line with the idea of an attempt to make change, being an asshole to said creators is not excused.

The same goes for the other side of the fandom debacles: for the people who are shipping the canonized ships. Nothing—nothing—is an excuse for bad behavior. I don’t care if you’re being attacked, that’s not a valid reason to troll back. Delete flaming anon messages. Use the “ignore” feature when you come across hate in the tags. DO NOT ENGAGE IN KIND. And for the few who actually go into the other ship tags to gloat: bad form. And those who send hate to actors who happen to play a character who is currently impeding a canon ship: NO. NO, NO, NO, NO.

I sometimes wonder if social media has given so many of us a false sense of access to those who make the things we purport to love. We get to send messages now in real time—rather than sticking a stamp on a letter and hoping it’ll make it to our target. (Yes, there were days when the only way to send fanmail to an actor was through the studio, and there was never a guarantee that they would actually receive it.) Now, we mention actors, writers, et al in tweets which we know in theory they could see in real time. And some even respond back on occasion—which creates this idea that they’ve opened a dialogue with the entire fandom and have the time and inclination to hear everyone’s thoughts and opinions of how things should be done. And that gets misconstrued from us providing feedback in a forum to this entitled idea that we, the fans, actually have a vital part in the direction of the series outside of viewership ratings. We don’t. I’m sorry, but WE DON’T.

Anyway, I didn’t mean to get all verbose and ranty. I usually ignore the bad behavior (often literally with the ignore function)—mainly because no matter what I say or how reasonable I am in my arguments, people are going to do what they’re going to do. But it felt good to get this off my chest anyway.

1PM
literatureloveaffair:

My beautiful sister ( the-australian-moose) made me this for Christmas, but couldn’t wait to give it to me I love it so much ❤

literatureloveaffair:

My beautiful sister ( the-australian-moose) made me this for Christmas, but couldn’t wait to give it to me I love it so much

12PM

kappatain-crunch:

missin somebody a lot but not wanting to seem clingy

image

(Source: kappataincrunch, via jonnyrivas)

11AM
“I am the girl who prefers to spend her Friday night curled up with her pillow, reading a good novel, and I am also the girl who likes to go out on a Saturday night and dance until the DJ plays his last song. I am the girl who wants to wear beat up converses and an oversized sweatshirt, and I am also the girl who who owns over sixty dresses and too many shoes to count. Why did it become okay to say one is better than the other? Because I am all of that.”

Ming D. Liu, What is “better?”

(via propertyoffrankgrimes)

(via solennita)

October172014
“Library and information service is meant to assist individuals in their individual pursuit to have a better life. This does not mean that each time an information worker answers a question it profoundly alters a patron’s life, but it does imply that every time questions are answered correctly the patron is able to accomplish a task, resolve a problem, or plan their future just a little better. In this way, the profession assumes that not only individuals, but organizations and society as a whole are changed, and, in the long run, improved by ideas. Improvement may mean many different things: providing information to a scientist to discover a new drug; stimulating the imagination of a child by providing reading or viewing material; providing training information to adults; or providing programming for mothers or the elderly.” Rubin, R. & Froehlich, T. J. (2010). Ethical aspects of library and information science. In Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences.  (pp. 1743-1755). (via theseareafewofmyfavoritethingsss)

(via libralthinking)

6PM
octoberspirit:

schazam:

i-think-im-so-funny:

This is so true it’s not even funny.

octoberspirit:

schazam:

i-think-im-so-funny:

This is so true it’s not even funny.

(via marissa1982)

5PM

(Source: gusfringg, via wholia87)

4PM
continuants:

nonnonmodernist:

elvishbabe:

this is my new favourite thing in the world

me and continuants

very accurate depiction of this weekend

continuants:

nonnonmodernist:

elvishbabe:

this is my new favourite thing in the world

me and continuants

very accurate depiction of this weekend

(Source: lolfactory)

2PM
weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks YA Flow Chart!
Like thrillers? Contemporary? Romance? Graphic Novels? Humor? We’ve got recommendations for you!

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks YA Flow Chart!

Like thrillers? Contemporary? Romance? Graphic Novels? Humor? We’ve got recommendations for you!

(via sashanako)

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