April162014
Today’s agenda: work on my exam for my CATaloging class #libraryhumor #MLIS #libraryschool #catlady #catsofinstagram

Today’s agenda: work on my exam for my CATaloging class #libraryhumor #MLIS #libraryschool #catlady #catsofinstagram

April152014
11AM
In honor of National Library Week, I’m switching phone cases #books #nlw14 #LivesChange

In honor of National Library Week, I’m switching phone cases #books #nlw14 #LivesChange

April142014

(Source: stefdelima, via tve116)

6PM

beardedsaint:

I’ll take one of each. Thanks

(Source: kashimiru, via marissa1982)

wine 

5PM
mainframe110:

The new Guardians of the Galaxy trailer looks spectacular

mainframe110:

The new Guardians of the Galaxy trailer looks spectacular

(via continuants)

4PM

smithsonian:

Protip: This is a really bad question to ask when visiting the National Mall. We have 8 buildings surrounding the Mall, and a total of 19 museums, 9 research centers and the National Zoo. A S.H.I.E.L.D agent should know better! 

(We think she means the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in this case.)  

(Source: runakvaed, via sashanako)

2PM
1PM

meganlara:

"Let Me In"

Only an act of true love can thaw a frozen heart

This illustration is a parody/mash-up of sorts that I (Megan Lara) created— I based it exactly on Mucha’s art nouveau pieces “The Cowslip" and "The Feather,” which I quite often see as a diptych.  I have several different versions of this available as prints and things!  I packed a ton of references into these pieces, some more subtle than others. :)  I hope you enjoy it!  I had a blast creating it. :)

The original version, with the exact layout based on Mucha’s pieces, can be found as a print on Redbubble.  

The cropped version, which I think frames better than the original version, can be found on Society6 (currently has a promo for $5 off each item and free shipping!) as a print, mug, pillow, tote bag, etc!  

The version I created for t-shirts (in order to get rid of the boxy design, I used several of Mucha’s flourishes to make it more aesthetically pleasing, and added text) is available as a shirt on Society6 ($5 off plus free shipping atm—also available on things other than shirts), Design By Humans and Redbubble (kid’s clothes available on Redbubble and Society6 btw!)

AND finally, signed prints available in my Etsy store. :)

P
hew!

(via everythinginfinite)

12PM
11AM

hellapunx:

*cuddles up close to you* *puts my mouth by your ear* I NEED CONSTANT REASSURANCE THAT YOU STILL ENJOY ME AND FIND OUR RELATIONSHIP APPEALING

(via lionwhispers)

April132014

Tom Hiddleston + Black and White

(Source: cheers-mrhiddleston, via wholia87)

5PM

thedeedledee:

bloominrose:

kateordie:

Oh god I feel this so hard

image

OH GOD how could a show about a man with SEVERE OCD DO THAT WITH ITS BOX SETS

(Source: thepossibility, via loveaffairwiththelibrary)

4PM
newsweek:

When George Laurer goes to the grocery store, he doesn’t tell the check-out people that he invented the barcode, but his wife used to point it out. “My husband here’s the one who invented that barcode,” she’d occasionally say. And the check-out people would look at him like, “you mean there was a time when we didn’t have barcodes?”
A time without barcodes is hard to imagine now. But it wasn’t that long ago, and the story doesn’t start with George Laurer. It starts with an engineer named Joseph Woodland. In 1948 Woodland was trying to come up with simple symbol that, when scanned, would translate to a number that a computer could use to identify a product.
The Untold History of Where Barcodes Come From

newsweek:

When George Laurer goes to the grocery store, he doesn’t tell the check-out people that he invented the barcode, but his wife used to point it out. “My husband here’s the one who invented that barcode,” she’d occasionally say. And the check-out people would look at him like, “you mean there was a time when we didn’t have barcodes?”

A time without barcodes is hard to imagine now. But it wasn’t that long ago, and the story doesn’t start with George Laurer. It starts with an engineer named Joseph Woodland. In 1948 Woodland was trying to come up with simple symbol that, when scanned, would translate to a number that a computer could use to identify a product.

The Untold History of Where Barcodes Come From

(via continuants)

2PM

nihilistic-delusions:

Double Standards, 2014

(via conquer-gravity)

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